Is “Selling” a Dirty Word?

is selling dirty

Is “Selling” a Dirty Word?  It’s paid off in many ways. How much are you selling? Is your business where it needs to be monetarily? It’s paid off in many ways.

By keeping in touch and share each others content. By shifting and use collaboration, it does work and it helps us all when we can support each other.

How much are you selling? There I said it.

Is your business where it needs to be monetarily? Frankly! Are you making enough money? Much of what I am reading lately seems focused on encouraging and helping entrepreneurs to be more attractive to their prospects but selling seems to be a dirty word.

The implication is; if you are more attractive to your buyers they will want to buy from you. This is indeed true and important but it is only one side of the equation. It is passive selling. Potential buyers do not always readily move from know, like and trust to the act of making a purchase. To be clear, they may know, like and trust you but may not actually buy from you.

Social media is concerned with getting more followers and building larger lists, which incidentally I do not disagree with. However it seems we need more conversation about what to do once you have a fan base. What are you doing to qualify potential buyers? Are you even asking for the sale?

In my book “Turn Your Business Card Into Business,” I quote Chicago humorist Aaron Freeman who says, “If you don’t hear no five times a day . . . you ain’t askin’ for enough.”

It seems lately the word “selling” is not a dirty word, is not to be mentioned in polite company. Selling is the act of exchanging goods or services for gain and it is the essence of business. Selling is also an active verb referring to the act of using persuasive tactics to encourage the consummation of a sale.

So I ask, how much are you selling? Check out my services

The trouble begins when we have people who know, like and trust us because we think of those people as friends. We may not want to ask our friends for money. We may not want to ask anyone for money for a number of reasons.

This attitude toward money is a barrier to successful selling and indeed successful business building. I suggest you make it clear early in the process that you are in the business of providing your goods or services for sale and ascertain from your prospect if they are potentially willing to buy from you if they like what you are offering.

If you are squeamish about “selling” or the idea of being a “seller” of goods or services, I suggest you consider this. You have a product that is presumably of value which has the potential to improve an individual’s life or business. People cannot experience that value until you share it with them.

You have costs associated with producing your product, and in order to survive and prosper you need to add a premium over and above your cost. That premium is your profit – – which also is not a dirty word.

So there! You are not a (dare I say it) salesman.

You are a sharer of value at a premium. So go out and ask people to share in your experience. By doing so, more people will become happily involved in your offering and you will do so at a premium which will allow you to continue in your quest to better the world. But you have to ask.

Written by
Reno Lovison has been providing marketing services for over twenty years. He is the executive producer at AuthorsBroadCast.com creating and displaying web videos; and is the author of “Turn Your Business Card Into Business” which he asks you consider purchasing if you are interested in techniques that will help you grow your local service business. http://www.authorsbroadcast.com

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